Escapando en MIG-25 y el inicio del F-15 Eagle

Pinguin

Colaborador
Colaborador
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20160905-the-pilot-who-stole-a-secret-soviet-fighter-jet


The pilot who stole a secret Soviet fighter jet

When pilot Viktor Belenko defected 40 years ago, he did so in a mysterious Soviet plane – the MiG-25. BBC Future investigates the far-reaching effects of one of the Cold War’s most intriguing events.

  • By Stephen Dowling
5 September 2016
On 6 September 1976, an aircraft appears out of the clouds near the Japanese city of Hakodate, on the northern island of Hokkaido. It’s a twin-engined jet, but not the kind of short-haul airliner Hakodate is used to seeing. This huge, grey hulk sports the red stars of the Soviet Union. No-one in the West has ever seen one before.

The jet lands on Hakodate’s concrete-and-asphalt runway. The runway, it turns out, is not long enough. The jet ploughs through hundreds of feet of earth before it finally comes to rest at the far end of the airport.

The pilot climbs out of the plane’s cockpit and fires two warning shots from his pistol – motorists on the road next to the airport have been taking pictures of this strange sight. It is some minutes before airport officials, driving from the terminal, reach him. It is then that the 29-year-old pilot, Flight Lieutenant Viktor Ivanovich Belenko of the Soviet Air Defence Forces, announces that he wishes to defect.

It is no normal defection. Belenko has not wandered into an embassy, or jumped ship while visiting a foreign port. The plane that he has flown 400-odd miles, and which now sits stranded at the end of a provincial Japanese runway, is the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25. It is the most secretive aircraft the Soviet Union has ever built.

Until Belenko’s landing, that is.

The West first became aware of what would become known as the MiG-25 around 1970. Spy satellites stalking Soviet airfields picked up a new kind of aircraft being tested in secret. They looked like enormous fighter planes, and the West’s militaries were concerned by one particular feature; they sported very large wings.


The XB-70 bomber would have been able to fly at three times the speed of sound (Credit: Science Photo Library)

A large wing area is very useful in a fighter plane – it helps generate lift and it also decreases the amount of weight distributed across the wing, which helps make it more nimble and easier to turn. This Soviet jet seemed to combine this ability with a pair of enormous engines. How fast could it go? Could anything in the US Air Force or other militaries keep up with it?

There had also been glimpses in the Middle East. In March 1971, Israel picked up a strange new aircraft that accelerated to Mach 3.2 – more than three times the speed of sound – and climbed to 63,000ft (nearly 20 kilometres). The Israelis, and US intelligence advisors, had never seen anything like it. Following a second sighting a few days later, Israeli fighters scrambled to intercept the aircraft but couldn’t even come close.

The Pentagon put two and two together, and came up with a Cold War crisis

In November, the Israelis ambushed one of these mysterious intruders, firing missiles head on from 30,000ft below. It was a useless gesture. Their unidentified target streaked past at nearly three times the speed of sound – so fast the jet was already out of the danger zone by the time the missiles exploded.

The Pentagon put two and two together, and came up with a Cold War crisis. They believed this jet was the same one that had been glimpsed from the satellite photos. They were suddenly presented with the prospect of a Soviet fighter that could outrun and out-turn anything in the US Air Force.


The US thought it was dealing with a Soviet fighter that could outfly anything (Credit: US Navy)

It was a classic case of military misinterpretation, says Stephen Trimble, the US editor of Flightglobal. “They seemed to overestimate its abilities on pure appearance,” he says, “from the size of the wing and the huge size of its air intakes.

“They knew it would be very fast, and also thought it would be very manoeuvrable. They were right about the first one, but not so right about the second one.”

What the US satellites had seen, and the Israeli radars had tracked, were versions of the same aircraft – the MiG-25. It was built as a reaction to a series of aircraft the US were preparing to bring into service in the 1960s – from the F-108 fighter plane to the SR-71 spyplane and the massive B-70 bomber. These aircraft all had one thing in common – they would fly at three times the speed of sound.

The technological leap needed to take an aircraft from Mach 2 to Mach 3 was an enormous challenge

In the 1950s, the Soviets had largely kept pace with the leapfrogging advances in aviation. They had bombers that could fly almost as fast and as high as the American B-52. Their fighter planes – many of which were made by the MiG design team – rivalled their American counterparts, though their radar and other electronics weren’t quite so sophisticated.

But the technological leap needed to take an aircraft from Mach 2 to Mach 3 was an enormous challenge. And this is what Soviet designers would have to do, as quickly as possible.

Led by MiG’s brilliant Rostislav Belyakov, the design team set to work. To fly so fast, the new fighter would need engines pushing out colossal amounts of thrust. Tumansky, the leading engine designer of the USSR, had already built an engine they believed could do the job, the R-15 turbojet, which had been intended for a high-altitude cruise missile project. The new MiG would need two of them, each capable of pushing out 11 tonnes of thrust each.


The MiG-25 was almost as big as a World War Two-era Lancaster bomber (Credit: US Navy)

Flying so fast creates enormous amounts of friction heat as the aircraft pushes against air molecules. When Lockheed built the SR-71 Blackbird, they built it out of titanium, which could withstand the enormous heat. But titanium is expensive and difficult to work with. Instead, MiG went with steel. And lots of it. The MiG-25 was welded together, by hand.

It’s only when you stand next to a MiG-25 – and there are several spending their retirement parked on the grass at some of Russia’s military museums – that you can fully appreciate just what a task it was. The MiG-25 is enormous. At 64ft (19.5m) long, it’s only a few feet shorter than a World War Two-era Lancaster bomber. The airframe needed to be this big to accommodate the engines and the enormous amount of fuel needed to power them. “The MiG-25 could carry something like 30,000lbs (13,600kg) of fuel,” says Trimble.

That heavy steel airframe was the reason the MiG-25 had such large wings – not to help it dogfight with US fighters, but simply in order to keep it in the air.

The MiGs were designed to take off and accelerate to Mach 2.5, guided to approaching targets by large, ground-based radars. When they were within 50 miles (80km), their own on-board radars would be able to take over, and they would fire their missiles – which, in keeping with the MiG’s enormous size, were some 20-feet-long (6m).

In the early 1970s, US defence chiefs knew nothing about the MiG’s capabilities – though they had given it the codename ‘Foxbat’

As a counter to the American Blackbird, MiG also built a reconnaissance version, which was unarmed, but carried cameras and other sensors. Without the weight of the missiles and the targeting radar, this version was lighter – and it could fly as fast as Mach 3.2. This was the version spotted by Israel in 1971.

But in the early 1970s, defence chiefs in the US knew nothing about the MiG’s capabilities – though they had given it the codename ‘Foxbat’. They knew it only from blurred photos taken from space and from blips on radar screens above the Mediterranean. Unless they could somehow get their hands on one, it seemed that the MiG would remain a mysterious threat.

That is, until a disillusioned Soviet fighter pilot hatched his plan.

Viktor Belenko had been a model Soviet citizen. He was born just after the end of World War Two, in the foothills of the Caucasus mountains. He entered military service and qualified as a fighter pilot – a role that brought with it certain perks compared to the average Soviet citizen.


Belenko's military ID is now on show at the CIA Museum in Washington DC (Credit: CIA Museum)

But Belenko was disillusioned. The father-of-one was facing a divorce. He had started to question the very nature of Soviet society, and whether America was as evil as the Communist regime suggested. “Soviet propaganda at that time portrayed you as a spoiled rotten society which has fallen apart,” Belenko told Full Context magazine in 1996. “But I had questions in my mind.”

Belenko realised the huge new fighter he was training in might be his key to escape. He was based at the Chuguyevka Airbase in Primorsky Krai, near the far eastern city of Vladivostok. Japan was only 400 miles (644km) away. The new MiG could fly fast and it could fly high, but its two giant gas-guzzling engines meant it couldn’t fly very far – certainly not far enough to land at a US airbase.

To evade both Soviet and Japanese military radar, Belenko had to fly very low – about 100ft above the sea

On 6 September Belenko flew off with fellow pilots on a training mission. None of the MiGs were armed. He had already worked out a rough route, and his MiG had a full tank of fuel.

He broke formation, and within a few minutes he was over the waves, heading towards Japan.

To evade both Soviet and Japanese military radar, Belenko had to fly very low – about 100ft (30m) above the sea. When he was far enough into Japanese airspace, he took the MiG up to 20,000ft (6,000m) so it could be picked up by Japanese radar. The surprised Japanese tried to hail this unidentified aircraft, but Belenko’s radio was tuned to the wrong frequencies. Japanese fighters were scrambled, but by then, Belenko had dropped below the thick cloud cover again. He disappeared off the Japanese radar screens.

All this time, the Soviet pilot had been flying by guesswork, on the memory of maps he’d studied before he’d taken off. Belenko had intended to fly his aircraft to Chitose airbase, but with fuel running low, he had to land at the nearest available airport. That, as it turned out, was Hakdodate.

The Japanese suddenly found themselves with a defecting pilot – and a fighter jet that had so far evaded Western intelligence agencies

Japan only really knew what they were dealing with when the MiG made its surprise landing.

The Japanese suddenly found themselves with a defecting pilot – and a fighter jet that had so far evaded Western intelligence agencies. Hakodate’s airport suddenly became a hive of intelligence activity. The CIA was scarcely able to believe its luck.


The MiG-25 helped spur the development of the F-15, which still flies in US service today (Credit: iStock)

The MiG was exhaustively examined after being moved to a nearby airbase.

“By disassembling the MiG-25 and inspecting it piece-by-piece over several weeks, they were able to understand exactly what they were capable of,” says Trimble.

The Soviets had not built the ‘super-fighter’ the Pentagon had feared, says Smithsonian aviation curator Roger Connor, but an inflexible aircraft built to do a very particular job.

“The MiG-25 was not a very useful combat aircraft,” says Connor. “It was an expensive, and cumbersome aircraft, and it wasn’t particularly effective in combat.”

There were other problems too. Flying at Mach 3 meant enormous pressure on the engines. Lockheed’s SR-71 had solved this by putting cones in the front of the engines, which slowed the air down enough so it didn’t damage engine components. The air could then be forced out the back of the engine to help generate more thrust.

The MiG tracked at Mach 3.2 by Israel in 1971 essentially destroyed its engines in the process

The MiG’s turbojets generated thrust by sucking in air to help burn the fuel. Above 2,000mph (3,2000km/h), however, things started to go wrong. The sheer force of the air could overwhelm the fuel pumps, dumping more and more fuel into the engine. And at the same time, the force exerted by the compressors would be so huge it would start sucking up parts of the engine. The MiG would start eating itself.

MiG-25 pilots were warned never to exceed Mach 2.8; the MiG tracked at Mach 3.2 by Israel in 1971 essentially destroyed its engines in the process, and was lucky to return to base.


The threat of the MiG-25 prevented the SR-71 Blackbird from flying over Soviet territory (Credit: iStock)

The spectre of the MiG-25 had caused the US to embark on a major new aircraft project – one that had helped create the F-15 Eagle, a fighter designed to be fast but also highly manoeuvrable like the MiG was thought to be. Forty years later, the F-15 is still in service.

In hindsight, the MiG, which the West had been so worried about, turned out to be a ‘paper tiger’. Its massive radar was years behind US models because instead of transistors it used antiquated vacuum tubes (a technology that did, however, make it impervious to electromagnetic pulses from nuclear blasts). The huge engines required so much fuel that the MiG was surprisingly short-ranged. It could take-off quickly, and fly in a straight line very fast to fire missiles or take pictures. That is about it.

The MiG that the Soviet Union had kept hidden from the world for several years was partially reassembled, and then loaded on a boat for its return to the USSR. The Japanese charged the Soviets a $40,000 bill for shipping costs and the damage Belenko had inflicted at Hakodate airport.

It’s like Usain Bolt, except it’s a Usain Bolt that’s actually running slower than the marathon runner – Roger Connor, Smithsonian Air & Space Museum

It soon became clear that the much-feared MiG was unable to intercept the US military’s SR-71, one of the planes it was built to deal with.

“The one big difference between the MiG and the SR-71, is that the SR-71 is not only fast, but it’s running a marathon,” says Connor. “The MiG is doing a sprint. It’s like Usain Bolt, except it’s a Usain Bolt that’s actually running slower than the marathon runner.”

These limitations didn’t stop MiG building more than 1,200 MiG-25s. The ‘Foxbat’ became a prestige plane for Soviet-backed air forces, who saw the propaganda value in fielding the second-fastest plane on Earth. Algeria and Syria are still thought to be flying them today. India used the reconnaissance model with great success for 25 years; they were only retired in 2006 because of a lack of spare parts.

The fear of the MiG-25 was its most impressive effect, says Trimble. “Until 1976, [the US] didn’t know that it wasn’t capable of intercepting the SR-71, and that kept them out of Soviet airspace the entire period. The Soviets had been very sensitive to the idea of these overflights.”


The MiG-31 is essentially an improved version of the MiG-25 (Credit: US Department of Defense)

Belenko himself did not return to the USSR with his partially dismantled fighter plane. The high-profile defector was allowed to move to the United States – his US citizenship approved personally approved by US president Jimmy Carter – where he become an aeronautics engineer and consultant to the US Air Force.

His military ID, and the notes he scribbled on a knee pad as he flew above the Sea of Japan are now on display at the CIA Museum in Washington DC.

The MiG-25’s shortcomings, and the arrival of the American F-15, spurred Soviet designers to come up with new designs. Trimble says this eventually led to the Su-27 series designed by MiG’s rival Sukhoi. It has been built in a myriad of ever-improving versions. It is exactly the kind of plane the Pentagon worried about at the beginning of the 1970s – fast and nimble – and the newer versions are probably the best fighter plane flying today, he says.

The MiG-25’s story hasn’t ended entirely either. The design was heavily modified to create the MiG-31, a fighter armed with sophisticated sensors, a powerful radar and better engines. “The MiG-31 is essentially a full realisation of what the MiG-25 was supposed to be,” says Trimble. The MiG-31 entered service a few years before the end of the Cold War, and hundreds still patrol Russia’s vast borders. Western observers have had plenty of opportunities to see the MiG-31 at airshows, though much of their inner workings remain closely guarded.

After all, no Russian pilot has decided – for whatever reason – to seek exile outside of that vast country, and flown their MiG-31 to an unsuspecting foreign airfield.
 

Pinguin

Colaborador
Colaborador
El piloto que robó un avión de combate soviético secreto

Cuando el piloto Viktor Belenko desertó hace 40 años, lo hizo en un avión soviético misterioso - el MiG-25. BBC Future investiga los efectos de largo alcance de uno de los eventos más interesantes de la Guerra Fría.

Por Stephen Dowling

5 de septiembre de el año 2016
El 6 de septiembre de 1976, un avión aparece fuera de las nubes cerca de la ciudad japonesa de Hakodate, en la isla norteña de Hokkaido. Es un avión bimotor, pero no el tipo de avión de pasajeros de corta distancia Hakodate está acostumbrado a ver. Este enorme, mole gris de los deportes de las estrellas rojas de la Unión Soviética. Nadie en Occidente se ha visto nunca antes.

El jet aterriza en la pista de hormigón y asfalto de Hakodate. La pista de aterrizaje, resulta que no es lo suficientemente largo. El chorro se abre camino a través de cientos de pies de la tierra antes de que se detiene completamente en el otro extremo del aeropuerto.

El piloto sale de la cabina del avión y dispara dos tiros de advertencia de la pistola - automovilistas en la carretera al lado del aeropuerto han estado tomando fotografías de esta extraña visión. Es algunos minutos antes de los funcionarios del aeropuerto, en coche de la terminal, llegar hasta él. Es entonces que el jugador de 29 años de edad, piloto, el teniente de vuelo Viktor Ivanovich Belenko de las Fuerzas de defensa antiaérea soviética, anuncia que desea desertar.

No es de deserción normal. Belenko no ha vagado en una embajada o abandonado el barco durante su visita a un puerto extranjero. El avión que ha volado 400 millas y pico, y que ahora se sienta varados en el extremo de una pista japonesa de la provincia, es el Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25. Es el avión más secreta de la Unión Soviética ha construido nunca.

Hasta el aterrizaje de Belenko, es decir.

El West tenido conocimiento de lo que se conocería como el MiG-25 alrededor de 1970. satélites espía que acechan aeródromos soviéticos recogieron un nuevo tipo de aeronave que está siendo probado en secreto. Parecían enormes aviones de combate, y los ejércitos de Occidente estaban preocupados por una característica particular; que lucían muy grandes alas.

El bombardero XB-70 habría sido capaz de volar a tres veces la velocidad del sonido (Crédito: Science Photo Library)

Una gran superficie de las alas es muy útil en un avión de combate - que ayuda a generar ascensor y también disminuye la cantidad de peso distribuido a través del ala, lo que ayuda a que sea más ágil y más fácil de girar. Este chorro Soviética parecía combinar esta capacidad con un par de enormes motores. ¿Qué tan rápido puede ir? ¿Puede haber algo en la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos o de otros militares continuar con ella?

También había habido destellos en el Medio Oriente. En marzo de 1971, Israel recibió un nuevo avión extraño que se aceleró hasta Mach 3.2 - más de tres veces la velocidad del sonido - y se subió a 63,000ft (casi 20 kilómetros). Los israelíes y los asesores de inteligencia de Estados Unidos, nunca había visto nada igual. Después de un segundo avistamiento unos días más tarde, los combatientes israelíes se apresuraron a interceptar la aeronave, pero no pudieron siquiera se acercan.

El Pentágono puso dos y dos, y se acercó con una crisis de la Guerra Fría

En noviembre, los israelíes emboscados uno de estos misteriosos intrusos, disparando misiles de frente de 30.000 pies por debajo. Fue un gesto inútil. Su pasado de destino no identificado con rayas en casi tres veces la velocidad del sonido - tan rápido que el chorro ya estaba fuera de la zona de peligro por el momento los misiles explotaron.

El Pentágono puso dos y dos, y se acercó con una crisis de la Guerra Fría. Se cree que este avión era el mismo que había sido vislumbrado desde las fotos de satélite. Ellos se presentaron repentinamente con la perspectiva de un caza soviético que podría correr más rápido y fuera de convertir cualquier cosa en la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos.

Los EE.UU. pensamos que estaba tratando con un caza soviético que podrían outfly nada (Crédito: US Navy)

Fue un caso clásico de una mala interpretación militar, dice Stephen Trimble, el editor estadounidense de Flightglobal. "Parecían a sobreestimar sus habilidades en la apariencia pura", dice, "desde el tamaño de las bandas y el enorme tamaño de sus tomas de aire.

"Sabían que sería muy rápido, y también pensaron que sería muy maniobrable. Ellos tenían razón sobre la primera, pero no tan a la derecha sobre el segundo ".

Lo que los satélites estadounidenses habían visto, y los radares israelíes habían seguido, fueron versiones de la misma aeronave - el MiG-25. Fue construido como una reacción a una serie de aviones los EE.UU. estábamos preparando para poner en servicio en la década de 1960 - desde el avión de combate F-108 al avión espía SR-71 y la masiva B-70 bombardero. Estos aviones todos tenían una cosa en común - que volarían a tres veces la velocidad del sonido.

El salto tecnológico necesario para tomar un avión de Mach 2 a Mach 3 era un enorme desafío

En la década de 1950, los soviéticos habían mantenido en gran medida el ritmo de los avances salto de etapas en la aviación. Tenían bombarderos que podían volar casi tan rápido y tan alto como la American B-52. Sus aviones de combate - muchos de los cuales fueron realizados por el equipo de diseño MiG - rivalizaban con sus homólogos estadounidenses, aunque sus radares y otros aparatos electrónicos no eran tan sofisticados.

Pero el salto tecnológico necesario para tomar un avión de Mach 2 a Mach 3 era un enorme desafío. Y esto es lo que los diseñadores soviéticos tendrían que hacer, lo más rápidamente posible.

Dirigido por el brillante Rostislav Belyakov de MiG, el conjunto del equipo de diseño para trabajar. Para volar tan rápido, el nuevo caza necesitaría motores empuja hacia afuera cantidades colosales de empuje. Tumansky, el líder en el diseño del motor de la URSS, ya se había construido un motor que creían que podría hacer el trabajo, el turborreactor R-15, que había sido destinado a un proyecto de misil de crucero de gran altitud. El nuevo MiG necesitaría dos de ellos, cada uno capaz de empujar a cabo 11 toneladas de empuje cada uno.

El MiG-25 era casi tan grande como la Primera Guerra Mundial-era de la Segunda Lancaster bombardero (Crédito: US Navy)

Volar tan rápido crea enormes cantidades de calor por fricción que empuja los aviones contra las moléculas de aire. Cuando Lockheed construyó el SR-71 Blackbird, que lo construyó de titanio, lo que podría soportar el calor enorme. Pero de titanio es caro y difícil de trabajar. En su lugar, MiG fue con el acero. Y mucha de ella. El MiG-25 se sueldan entre sí, con la mano.

Es sólo cuando se pone de pie al lado de un MiG-25 - y hay varios de pasar su jubilación aparcado en la hierba en algunos de los museos militares de Rusia - que se puede apreciar plenamente la tarea justo lo que era. El MiG-25 es enorme. En 64ft (19.5m) de largo, es sólo unos pocos pies más corta que una Guerra Mundial-era de la Segunda Lancaster bombardero. El fuselaje tenía que ser así de grande para acomodar los motores y la enorme cantidad de combustible necesario para poder ellos. "El MiG-25 podría llevar a algo así como 30,000lbs (13,600kg) de combustible", dice Trimble.

Eso fuselaje de acero pesado fue la razón del MiG-25 tenía alas tan grandes - no para ayudar a que mano a mano con los combatientes de Estados Unidos, sino simplemente con el fin de mantenerlo en el aire.

Los MiGs fueron diseñados para despegar y acelerar a Mach 2,5, guiado a los objetivos que se acercan por los radares grandes, con base en tierra. Cuando estaban a menos de 50 millas (80 km), sus propios radares de a bordo serían capaces de asumir el control, y que les disparan sus misiles - el cual, de acuerdo con el enorme tamaño del MiG, fueron algunos de 20 pies de largo (6m) .

A principios de la década de 1970, los jefes de defensa de Estados Unidos no sabían nada acerca de las capacidades de los MiG - a pesar de que se habían dado el nombre en clave "Foxbat"

Como un contador para el mirlo americano, MiG también construyó una versión de reconocimiento, que estaba desarmado, pero lleva cámaras y otros sensores. Sin el peso de los misiles y el radar de orientación, esta versión era más ligero - y que podía volar tan rápido como Mach 3,2. Esta fue la versión manchada por Israel en 1971.

Sin embargo, a principios de 1970, los jefes de defensa de los EE.UU. sabían nada acerca de las capacidades de los MiG - a pesar de que habían dado el nombre en clave "Foxbat". Sabían que sólo a partir de imágenes borrosas tomadas desde el espacio y desde repuntes en las pantallas de radar sobre el Mediterráneo. A menos que de alguna manera podrían tener en sus manos en uno, parecía que el MiG seguiría siendo una amenaza misteriosa.

Es decir, hasta que un piloto de combate soviético desilusionados urdió su plan.

Viktor Belenko había sido un ciudadano soviético modelo. Él nació justo después del final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, en las estribaciones de las montañas del Cáucaso. Entró en el servicio militar y calificado como piloto de combate - un papel que trajo consigo ciertas ventajas en comparación con el promedio ciudadano soviético.

Identificación militar de Belenko ahora está en exhibición en el Museo de la CIA en Washington DC (Crédito: Museo de la CIA)

Pero Belenko estaba desilusionado. El único padre de hacía frente a un divorcio. Había empezado a cuestionar la naturaleza misma de la sociedad soviética, y si Estados Unidos era tan malo como el régimen comunista sugirió. "La propaganda soviética en ese momento se presenta como una sociedad podrida en mal estado que se ha venido abajo", dijo a la revista Belenko contexto completo en 1996. "Pero yo tenía preguntas en mi mente."

Belenko dio cuenta de la enorme nuevo caza que estaba entrenando en que podría ser la llave para escapar. Él se basó en la base aérea de Chuguyevka en Primorsky Krai, cerca de la ciudad más oriental de Vladivostok. Japón fue sólo 400 millas (644km) de distancia. El nuevo MiG podía volar rápido y que podría volar muy alto, pero sus dos motores gigantes que consumen mucha gasolina significaba que no podía volar muy lejos - ciertamente no lo suficiente como para aterrizar en una base aérea estadounidense.

Para evadir tanto radar militar soviética y japonés, Belenko tuvo que volar muy bajo - alrededor de 100 pies por encima del mar

El 6 de septiembre Belenko voló con otros pilotos en una misión de entrenamiento. Ninguno de los MiGs estaban armados. Ya había elaborado una primitiva ruta, y su MiG tenía un tanque lleno de combustible.

Se rompió la formación, y dentro de unos minutos estaba sobre las olas, en dirección a Japón.

Para evadir tanto radar militar soviética y japonés, Belenko tuvo que volar muy bajo - alrededor de 100 pies (30 m) por encima del mar. Cuando estaba lo suficientemente lejos en el espacio aéreo japonés, tomó el MiG hasta 20.000 pies (6.000 m) para que pueda ser registrado por el radar japonés. Los japoneses sorprendidos trataron de llamar a esta aeronave no identificada, pero la radio de Belenko estaba sintonizada a las frecuencias equivocadas. cazas japoneses fueron enviados, pero para entonces, Belenko habían caído por debajo de la gruesa capa de nubes de nuevo. Él desapareció de las pantallas de radar japoneses.

Durante todo este tiempo, el piloto soviético había estado volando por conjeturas, en la memoria de los mapas que había estudiado antes de que él había quitado. Belenko había tenido la intención de volar su avión a la base aérea de Chitose, pero con combustible baja, tuvo que aterrizar en el aeropuerto más cercano disponible. Que, como se vio después, era Hakdodate.

El japonés se encontraron de repente con un piloto de desertar - y un avión de combate que habían eludido hasta ahora las agencias de inteligencia occidentales

Japón sólo es realmente sabía lo que estaban tratando con el MiG cuando hizo su aterrizaje sorpresa.

El japonés se encontraron de repente con un piloto de desertar - y un avión de combate que habían eludido hasta ahora las agencias de inteligencia occidentales. El aeropuerto de Hakodate pronto se convirtió en un hervidero de actividad de inteligencia. La CIA apenas era capaz de creer su suerte.

El MiG-25 ayudó a estimular el desarrollo de los aviones F-15, que todavía vuela en servicio de los Estados Unidos hoy (Crédito: IStock)

El MiG fue examinado de forma exhaustiva después de haber sido trasladado a una base aérea cercana.

"Al desmontar el MiG-25 y inspeccionarlo pieza por pieza durante varias semanas, fueron capaces de entender exactamente lo que eran capaces", dice Trimble.

Los soviéticos no habían construido el "super-luchador 'el Pentágono había temido, dice Smithsonian aviación comisario Roger Connor, pero una aeronave rígida construida para hacer un trabajo muy particular.

"El MiG-25 no era un avión de combate muy útil", dice Connor. "Era un avión caro, y engorrosos, y no era particularmente eficaz en el combate."

Había otros problemas también. Volando a Mach 3 significó una enorme presión sobre los motores. SR-71 de Lockheed había resuelto esto poniendo conos en la parte delantera de los motores, lo que frenó el aire lo suficiente como para que no dañe los componentes del motor. El aire podría entonces ser forzado a salir de la parte posterior del motor para ayudar a generar más empuje.

El MiG rastreados a Mach 3,2 por Israel en 1971 destruyeron esencialmente sus motores en el proceso

turborreactores de los MiG generados empujados por la succión en el aire para ayudar a quemar el combustible. Por encima de 2.000 mph (3,2000km / h), sin embargo, las cosas empezaron a ir mal. La fuerza pura del aire podría saturar las bombas de combustible, el vertido de más y más combustible en el motor. Y al mismo tiempo, la fuerza ejercida por los compresores sería tan grande que sería empezar a chupar hasta partes del motor. El MiG sería empezar a comer sí.

MiG-25 pilotos fueron advertidos de no superar nunca Mach 2,8; el MiG rastreados a Mach 3,2 por Israel en 1971 destruyeron esencialmente sus motores en el proceso, y la suerte de volver a la base.

La amenaza del MiG-25 impidió que el SR-71 Blackbird vuelen sobre territorio soviético (Crédito: IStock)

El espectro del MiG-25 había causado los EE.UU. para embarcarse en un nuevo e importante proyecto de avión - uno que había ayudado a crear el F-15 Eagle, un caza diseñado para ser rápido, sino también altamente maniobrable como el MiG se pensaba que era. Cuarenta años más tarde, el F-15 todavía está en servicio.

En retrospectiva, el MiG, que Occidente había estado tan preocupado por, resultó ser un "tigre de papel". Su masiva de radar fue años detrás de los modelos de Estados Unidos porque en lugar de transistores que utilizan tubos de vacío anticuados (una tecnología que no, sin embargo, hacen que sea impermeable a los pulsos electromagnéticos de las explosiones nucleares). Los enormes motores requieren tanto combustible que el MiG fue sorprendentemente corto a distancia. Podría despegue rápidamente, y volar en línea recta muy rápido para disparar misiles o tomar fotografías. Eso es todo.

El MiG que la Unión Soviética había mantenido escondido del mundo durante varios años se ha vuelto a montar parcialmente y, a continuación, cargado en un barco para su regreso a la URSS. Los japoneses cargaron los soviéticos un billete de $ 40.000 para los gastos de envío y el daño infligido Belenko había en el aeropuerto de Hakodate.

Es como Usain Bolt, excepto que es un Tornillo Usain que está actualmente en funcionamiento más lento que el corredor de maratón - Roger Connor, Smithsonian del Aire y Espacio Museo

Pronto se hizo evidente que el MiG-temida era incapaz de interceptar SR-71 del ejército de Estados Unidos, uno de los aviones que se construyó a tratar.

"La única gran diferencia entre el MiG y el SR-71, es que el SR-71 no sólo es rápido, sino que se está ejecutando un maratón", dice Connor. "El MiG está haciendo una carrera de velocidad. Es como Usain Bolt, excepto que es un Tornillo Usain que está actualmente en funcionamiento más lento que el corredor de maratón ".

Estas limitaciones no se detuvieron MiG la construcción de más de 1.200 MiG-25. El "Foxbat" se convirtió en un plano de prestigio para las fuerzas aéreas respaldo soviético, que vieron el valor de la propaganda en fildeo del segundo mejor plano de la Tierra. Argelia y Siria todavía se cree que están volando hoy en día. India utilizó el modelo de reconocimiento con gran éxito desde hace 25 años; que sólo fueron retirados en 2006 debido a la falta de piezas de repuesto.

El temor del MiG-25 fue su efecto más impresionante, dice Trimble. "Hasta 1976, [los EE.UU.] no sabíamos que no era capaz de interceptar la SR-71, y que los mantuvimos fuera del espacio aéreo soviético todo el período. Los soviéticos habían sido muy sensibles a la idea de esos vuelos ".

El MiG-31 es esencialmente una versión mejorada del MiG-25 (Crédito: Departamento de Defensa de Estados Unidos)

Belenko a sí mismo no volver a la URSS con su avión de combate parcialmente desmontado. El desertor de alto perfil se le permitió trasladarse a los Estados Unidos - a la ciudadanía estadounidense aprobado aprobado personalmente por el presidente de Estados Unidos Jimmy Carter - en el que se convierta en un ingeniero aeronáutico y consultor de la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos.

Su identificación militar, y las notas que garabateó en una rodillera mientras volaba sobre el mar de Japón están ahora en exhibición en el Museo de la CIA en Washington DC.

Las deficiencias de MiG-25, y la llegada de la American F-15, estimuló diseñadores soviéticos para llegar a nuevos diseños. Trimble dice que esto finalmente llevó a la serie Su-27 diseñado por el rival Sukhoi de MiG. Se ha construido en un sinfín de versiones cada vez mejores. Es exactamente el tipo de avión del Pentágono preocupaba a principios de la década de 1970 - rápidas y ágiles - y las versiones más recientes son probablemente el mejor avión de combate en vuelo actualmente, dice.

La historia de MiG-25 no ha terminado del todo bien. El diseño fue muy modificada para crear el MiG-31, un combatiente armado con sensores sofisticados, un potente radar y mejores motores. "El MiG-31 es esencialmente una plena realización de lo que el MiG-25 se suponía que era", dice Trimble. El MiG-31 entró en servicio un par de años antes del final de la Guerra Fría, y cientos todavía patrullan vastas fronteras de Rusia. Los observadores occidentales han tenido un montón de oportunidades para ver el MiG-31 en exhibiciones aéreas, aunque gran parte de su funcionamiento interno se mantienen estrechamente vigilado.

Después de todo, ningún piloto ruso ha decidido - por cualquier razón - que exiliarse fuera de ese vasto país, y trasladado a su MiG-31 a un campo de aviación extranjera desprevenido.
 
Está buena la nota pero tiene un tinte de rivalidad de guerra fría - si bien no fue EL super caza (que los soviéticos nunca quisieron diseñar), simplemente por performance le daba tremendas capacidades; para muestra fijarse en lo que les costaba agarrar a los MiG 25 en el Golfo, incluso con F15, y las misiones que hizo que abortaran; la única victoria aire aire iraquí de la guerra fue justamente de un MiG 25. Otro detalle, no se diseñó al MiG 25 para interceptar al SR71, sino para el XB70 Valkyrie, proyecto que cancelaron. Además hay que entender la filosofía soviética para la aviación (más pragmática, económica y robusta; adaptada a las capacidades de la URSS y al escenario nuclear de la 3era guerra mundial)
 
Última edición:

Grulla

Colaborador
Colaborador
Está buena la nota pero tiene un tinte de rivalidad de guerra fría - si bien no fue EL super caza (que los rusos soviéticos nunca quisieron diseñar), simplemente por performance le daba tremendas capacidades; para muestra fijarse en lo que les costaba agarrar a los MiG 25 en el Golfo, incluso con F15, y las misiones que hizo que abortaran; la única victoria aire aire iraquí de la guerra fue justamente de un MiG 25. Otro detalle, no se diseñó al MiG 25 para interceptar al SR71, sino para el XB70 Valkyrie, proyecto que cancelaron. Además hay que entender la filosofía soviética para la aviación (más pragmática, económica y robusta; adaptada a las capacidades de la URSS y al escenario nuclear de la 3era guerra mundial)

Yo tengo entendido que en epocas de la guerra fria se pensaba que el MiG-25 se diseño para interceptar al XB-70, pero con la caida de la URSS y el telón de acero se supo que en realidad se diseño para interceptar al Lockheed A-12 y sus variantes, el interceptor YF-12, el avión de reconocimiento estrategico SR-71 y la proyectada variante de ataque nuclear del mismo. Todos estos fueron previos al XB-70, y de hecho el MiG-25 voló unos meses antes que el XB-70
 
Yo tengo entendido que en epocas de la guerra fria se pensaba que el MiG-25 se diseño para interceptar al XB-70, pero con la caida de la URSS y el telón de acero se supo que en realidad se diseño para interceptar al Lockheed A-12 y sus variantes, el interceptor YF-12, el avión de reconocimiento estrategico SR-71 y la proyectada variante de ataque nuclear del mismo. Todos estos fueron previos al XB-70, y de hecho el MiG-25 voló unos meses antes que el XB-70
Entonces me quedé con info viejisima! El espíritu de mi post era "tampoco que era un tigre de papel".
 
Última edición:

Pinguin

Colaborador
Colaborador
Piensen que por algo desarrolaron el MIG-31 tambien y que de hecho este ultimo aun esta activo en el arsenal ruso y sigue siendo pieza clave para intercepta
 
El temita del radar a valvulas de vacio en lugar de transistores...

Lei que le sacaban el cuero con que usaban tecnologia vieja, tonces un ruso respondio: "hacemos aviones para la guerra, no para exhibiciones aereas"

El radar a valvulas era inmune a las ECM.

La idea era usarlo en manada, como interceptores, tratando de cortar el paso o encerrar, lanzar 4 misiles al mismo blanco (2 SARH y 2 IR), y volverse, chau, listo el pollo. El SR-71 se quedo volando afuera de la URSS, asi que sea por su propia tecnologia, o por miedito, el caso es que no sobrevolo territorio ruso.

Un avionazo...
 

Grulla

Colaborador
Colaborador
El temita del radar a valvulas de vacio en lugar de transistores...

Lei que le sacaban el cuero con que usaban tecnologia vieja, tonces un ruso respondio: "hacemos aviones para la guerra, no para exhibiciones aereas"

El radar a valvulas era inmune a las ECM.

La idea era usarlo en manada, como interceptores, tratando de cortar el paso o encerrar, lanzar 4 misiles al mismo blanco (2 SARH y 2 IR), y volverse, chau, listo el pollo. El SR-71 se quedo volando afuera de la URSS, asi que sea por su propia tecnologia, o por miedito, el caso es que no sobrevolo territorio ruso.

Un avionazo...

Es que esa era la caracteristica principal y la razon por la que el SR-71 de la USAF se impuso sobre el A-12 de la CIA. El A-12 debia volar sobre el objetivo para usar sus camaras, mientras que el SR-71 lo hacia por fuera de las fronteras enemigas gracias a sus sensores y camaras
 
El piloto que robó un avión de combate soviético secreto

Cuando el piloto Viktor Belenko desertó hace 40 años, lo hizo en un avión soviético misterioso - el MiG-25. BBC Future investiga los efectos de largo alcance de uno de los eventos más interesantes de la Guerra Fría.

Por Stephen Dowling

5 de septiembre de el año 2016
El 6 de septiembre de 1976, un avión aparece fuera de las nubes cerca de la ciudad japonesa de Hakodate, en la isla norteña de Hokkaido. Es un avión bimotor, pero no el tipo de avión de pasajeros de corta distancia Hakodate está acostumbrado a ver. Este enorme, mole gris de los deportes de las estrellas rojas de la Unión Soviética. Nadie en Occidente se ha visto nunca antes.

El jet aterriza en la pista de hormigón y asfalto de Hakodate. La pista de aterrizaje, resulta que no es lo suficientemente largo. El chorro se abre camino a través de cientos de pies de la tierra antes de que se detiene completamente en el otro extremo del aeropuerto.

El piloto sale de la cabina del avión y dispara dos tiros de advertencia de la pistola - automovilistas en la carretera al lado del aeropuerto han estado tomando fotografías de esta extraña visión. Es algunos minutos antes de los funcionarios del aeropuerto, en coche de la terminal, llegar hasta él. Es entonces que el jugador de 29 años de edad, piloto, el teniente de vuelo Viktor Ivanovich Belenko de las Fuerzas de defensa antiaérea soviética, anuncia que desea desertar.

No es de deserción normal. Belenko no ha vagado en una embajada o abandonado el barco durante su visita a un puerto extranjero. El avión que ha volado 400 millas y pico, y que ahora se sienta varados en el extremo de una pista japonesa de la provincia, es el Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25. Es el avión más secreta de la Unión Soviética ha construido nunca.

Hasta el aterrizaje de Belenko, es decir.

El West tenido conocimiento de lo que se conocería como el MiG-25 alrededor de 1970. satélites espía que acechan aeródromos soviéticos recogieron un nuevo tipo de aeronave que está siendo probado en secreto. Parecían enormes aviones de combate, y los ejércitos de Occidente estaban preocupados por una característica particular; que lucían muy grandes alas.

El bombardero XB-70 habría sido capaz de volar a tres veces la velocidad del sonido (Crédito: Science Photo Library)

Una gran superficie de las alas es muy útil en un avión de combate - que ayuda a generar ascensor y también disminuye la cantidad de peso distribuido a través del ala, lo que ayuda a que sea más ágil y más fácil de girar. Este chorro Soviética parecía combinar esta capacidad con un par de enormes motores. ¿Qué tan rápido puede ir? ¿Puede haber algo en la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos o de otros militares continuar con ella?

También había habido destellos en el Medio Oriente. En marzo de 1971, Israel recibió un nuevo avión extraño que se aceleró hasta Mach 3.2 - más de tres veces la velocidad del sonido - y se subió a 63,000ft (casi 20 kilómetros). Los israelíes y los asesores de inteligencia de Estados Unidos, nunca había visto nada igual. Después de un segundo avistamiento unos días más tarde, los combatientes israelíes se apresuraron a interceptar la aeronave, pero no pudieron siquiera se acercan.

El Pentágono puso dos y dos, y se acercó con una crisis de la Guerra Fría

En noviembre, los israelíes emboscados uno de estos misteriosos intrusos, disparando misiles de frente de 30.000 pies por debajo. Fue un gesto inútil. Su pasado de destino no identificado con rayas en casi tres veces la velocidad del sonido - tan rápido que el chorro ya estaba fuera de la zona de peligro por el momento los misiles explotaron.

El Pentágono puso dos y dos, y se acercó con una crisis de la Guerra Fría. Se cree que este avión era el mismo que había sido vislumbrado desde las fotos de satélite. Ellos se presentaron repentinamente con la perspectiva de un caza soviético que podría correr más rápido y fuera de convertir cualquier cosa en la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos.

Los EE.UU. pensamos que estaba tratando con un caza soviético que podrían outfly nada (Crédito: US Navy)

Fue un caso clásico de una mala interpretación militar, dice Stephen Trimble, el editor estadounidense de Flightglobal. "Parecían a sobreestimar sus habilidades en la apariencia pura", dice, "desde el tamaño de las bandas y el enorme tamaño de sus tomas de aire.

"Sabían que sería muy rápido, y también pensaron que sería muy maniobrable. Ellos tenían razón sobre la primera, pero no tan a la derecha sobre el segundo ".

Lo que los satélites estadounidenses habían visto, y los radares israelíes habían seguido, fueron versiones de la misma aeronave - el MiG-25. Fue construido como una reacción a una serie de aviones los EE.UU. estábamos preparando para poner en servicio en la década de 1960 - desde el avión de combate F-108 al avión espía SR-71 y la masiva B-70 bombardero. Estos aviones todos tenían una cosa en común - que volarían a tres veces la velocidad del sonido.

El salto tecnológico necesario para tomar un avión de Mach 2 a Mach 3 era un enorme desafío

En la década de 1950, los soviéticos habían mantenido en gran medida el ritmo de los avances salto de etapas en la aviación. Tenían bombarderos que podían volar casi tan rápido y tan alto como la American B-52. Sus aviones de combate - muchos de los cuales fueron realizados por el equipo de diseño MiG - rivalizaban con sus homólogos estadounidenses, aunque sus radares y otros aparatos electrónicos no eran tan sofisticados.

Pero el salto tecnológico necesario para tomar un avión de Mach 2 a Mach 3 era un enorme desafío. Y esto es lo que los diseñadores soviéticos tendrían que hacer, lo más rápidamente posible.

Dirigido por el brillante Rostislav Belyakov de MiG, el conjunto del equipo de diseño para trabajar. Para volar tan rápido, el nuevo caza necesitaría motores empuja hacia afuera cantidades colosales de empuje. Tumansky, el líder en el diseño del motor de la URSS, ya se había construido un motor que creían que podría hacer el trabajo, el turborreactor R-15, que había sido destinado a un proyecto de misil de crucero de gran altitud. El nuevo MiG necesitaría dos de ellos, cada uno capaz de empujar a cabo 11 toneladas de empuje cada uno.

El MiG-25 era casi tan grande como la Primera Guerra Mundial-era de la Segunda Lancaster bombardero (Crédito: US Navy)

Volar tan rápido crea enormes cantidades de calor por fricción que empuja los aviones contra las moléculas de aire. Cuando Lockheed construyó el SR-71 Blackbird, que lo construyó de titanio, lo que podría soportar el calor enorme. Pero de titanio es caro y difícil de trabajar. En su lugar, MiG fue con el acero. Y mucha de ella. El MiG-25 se sueldan entre sí, con la mano.

Es sólo cuando se pone de pie al lado de un MiG-25 - y hay varios de pasar su jubilación aparcado en la hierba en algunos de los museos militares de Rusia - que se puede apreciar plenamente la tarea justo lo que era. El MiG-25 es enorme. En 64ft (19.5m) de largo, es sólo unos pocos pies más corta que una Guerra Mundial-era de la Segunda Lancaster bombardero. El fuselaje tenía que ser así de grande para acomodar los motores y la enorme cantidad de combustible necesario para poder ellos. "El MiG-25 podría llevar a algo así como 30,000lbs (13,600kg) de combustible", dice Trimble.

Eso fuselaje de acero pesado fue la razón del MiG-25 tenía alas tan grandes - no para ayudar a que mano a mano con los combatientes de Estados Unidos, sino simplemente con el fin de mantenerlo en el aire.

Los MiGs fueron diseñados para despegar y acelerar a Mach 2,5, guiado a los objetivos que se acercan por los radares grandes, con base en tierra. Cuando estaban a menos de 50 millas (80 km), sus propios radares de a bordo serían capaces de asumir el control, y que les disparan sus misiles - el cual, de acuerdo con el enorme tamaño del MiG, fueron algunos de 20 pies de largo (6m) .

A principios de la década de 1970, los jefes de defensa de Estados Unidos no sabían nada acerca de las capacidades de los MiG - a pesar de que se habían dado el nombre en clave "Foxbat"

Como un contador para el mirlo americano, MiG también construyó una versión de reconocimiento, que estaba desarmado, pero lleva cámaras y otros sensores. Sin el peso de los misiles y el radar de orientación, esta versión era más ligero - y que podía volar tan rápido como Mach 3,2. Esta fue la versión manchada por Israel en 1971.

Sin embargo, a principios de 1970, los jefes de defensa de los EE.UU. sabían nada acerca de las capacidades de los MiG - a pesar de que habían dado el nombre en clave "Foxbat". Sabían que sólo a partir de imágenes borrosas tomadas desde el espacio y desde repuntes en las pantallas de radar sobre el Mediterráneo. A menos que de alguna manera podrían tener en sus manos en uno, parecía que el MiG seguiría siendo una amenaza misteriosa.

Es decir, hasta que un piloto de combate soviético desilusionados urdió su plan.

Viktor Belenko había sido un ciudadano soviético modelo. Él nació justo después del final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, en las estribaciones de las montañas del Cáucaso. Entró en el servicio militar y calificado como piloto de combate - un papel que trajo consigo ciertas ventajas en comparación con el promedio ciudadano soviético.

Identificación militar de Belenko ahora está en exhibición en el Museo de la CIA en Washington DC (Crédito: Museo de la CIA)

Pero Belenko estaba desilusionado. El único padre de hacía frente a un divorcio. Había empezado a cuestionar la naturaleza misma de la sociedad soviética, y si Estados Unidos era tan malo como el régimen comunista sugirió. "La propaganda soviética en ese momento se presenta como una sociedad podrida en mal estado que se ha venido abajo", dijo a la revista Belenko contexto completo en 1996. "Pero yo tenía preguntas en mi mente."

Belenko dio cuenta de la enorme nuevo caza que estaba entrenando en que podría ser la llave para escapar. Él se basó en la base aérea de Chuguyevka en Primorsky Krai, cerca de la ciudad más oriental de Vladivostok. Japón fue sólo 400 millas (644km) de distancia. El nuevo MiG podía volar rápido y que podría volar muy alto, pero sus dos motores gigantes que consumen mucha gasolina significaba que no podía volar muy lejos - ciertamente no lo suficiente como para aterrizar en una base aérea estadounidense.

Para evadir tanto radar militar soviética y japonés, Belenko tuvo que volar muy bajo - alrededor de 100 pies por encima del mar

El 6 de septiembre Belenko voló con otros pilotos en una misión de entrenamiento. Ninguno de los MiGs estaban armados. Ya había elaborado una primitiva ruta, y su MiG tenía un tanque lleno de combustible.

Se rompió la formación, y dentro de unos minutos estaba sobre las olas, en dirección a Japón.

Para evadir tanto radar militar soviética y japonés, Belenko tuvo que volar muy bajo - alrededor de 100 pies (30 m) por encima del mar. Cuando estaba lo suficientemente lejos en el espacio aéreo japonés, tomó el MiG hasta 20.000 pies (6.000 m) para que pueda ser registrado por el radar japonés. Los japoneses sorprendidos trataron de llamar a esta aeronave no identificada, pero la radio de Belenko estaba sintonizada a las frecuencias equivocadas. cazas japoneses fueron enviados, pero para entonces, Belenko habían caído por debajo de la gruesa capa de nubes de nuevo. Él desapareció de las pantallas de radar japoneses.

Durante todo este tiempo, el piloto soviético había estado volando por conjeturas, en la memoria de los mapas que había estudiado antes de que él había quitado. Belenko había tenido la intención de volar su avión a la base aérea de Chitose, pero con combustible baja, tuvo que aterrizar en el aeropuerto más cercano disponible. Que, como se vio después, era Hakdodate.

El japonés se encontraron de repente con un piloto de desertar - y un avión de combate que habían eludido hasta ahora las agencias de inteligencia occidentales

Japón sólo es realmente sabía lo que estaban tratando con el MiG cuando hizo su aterrizaje sorpresa.

El japonés se encontraron de repente con un piloto de desertar - y un avión de combate que habían eludido hasta ahora las agencias de inteligencia occidentales. El aeropuerto de Hakodate pronto se convirtió en un hervidero de actividad de inteligencia. La CIA apenas era capaz de creer su suerte.

El MiG-25 ayudó a estimular el desarrollo de los aviones F-15, que todavía vuela en servicio de los Estados Unidos hoy (Crédito: IStock)

El MiG fue examinado de forma exhaustiva después de haber sido trasladado a una base aérea cercana.

"Al desmontar el MiG-25 y inspeccionarlo pieza por pieza durante varias semanas, fueron capaces de entender exactamente lo que eran capaces", dice Trimble.

Los soviéticos no habían construido el "super-luchador 'el Pentágono había temido, dice Smithsonian aviación comisario Roger Connor, pero una aeronave rígida construida para hacer un trabajo muy particular.

"El MiG-25 no era un avión de combate muy útil", dice Connor. "Era un avión caro, y engorrosos, y no era particularmente eficaz en el combate."

Había otros problemas también. Volando a Mach 3 significó una enorme presión sobre los motores. SR-71 de Lockheed había resuelto esto poniendo conos en la parte delantera de los motores, lo que frenó el aire lo suficiente como para que no dañe los componentes del motor. El aire podría entonces ser forzado a salir de la parte posterior del motor para ayudar a generar más empuje.

El MiG rastreados a Mach 3,2 por Israel en 1971 destruyeron esencialmente sus motores en el proceso

turborreactores de los MiG generados empujados por la succión en el aire para ayudar a quemar el combustible. Por encima de 2.000 mph (3,2000km / h), sin embargo, las cosas empezaron a ir mal. La fuerza pura del aire podría saturar las bombas de combustible, el vertido de más y más combustible en el motor. Y al mismo tiempo, la fuerza ejercida por los compresores sería tan grande que sería empezar a chupar hasta partes del motor. El MiG sería empezar a comer sí.

MiG-25 pilotos fueron advertidos de no superar nunca Mach 2,8; el MiG rastreados a Mach 3,2 por Israel en 1971 destruyeron esencialmente sus motores en el proceso, y la suerte de volver a la base.

La amenaza del MiG-25 impidió que el SR-71 Blackbird vuelen sobre territorio soviético (Crédito: IStock)

El espectro del MiG-25 había causado los EE.UU. para embarcarse en un nuevo e importante proyecto de avión - uno que había ayudado a crear el F-15 Eagle, un caza diseñado para ser rápido, sino también altamente maniobrable como el MiG se pensaba que era. Cuarenta años más tarde, el F-15 todavía está en servicio.

En retrospectiva, el MiG, que Occidente había estado tan preocupado por, resultó ser un "tigre de papel". Su masiva de radar fue años detrás de los modelos de Estados Unidos porque en lugar de transistores que utilizan tubos de vacío anticuados (una tecnología que no, sin embargo, hacen que sea impermeable a los pulsos electromagnéticos de las explosiones nucleares). Los enormes motores requieren tanto combustible que el MiG fue sorprendentemente corto a distancia. Podría despegue rápidamente, y volar en línea recta muy rápido para disparar misiles o tomar fotografías. Eso es todo.

El MiG que la Unión Soviética había mantenido escondido del mundo durante varios años se ha vuelto a montar parcialmente y, a continuación, cargado en un barco para su regreso a la URSS. Los japoneses cargaron los soviéticos un billete de $ 40.000 para los gastos de envío y el daño infligido Belenko había en el aeropuerto de Hakodate.

Es como Usain Bolt, excepto que es un Tornillo Usain que está actualmente en funcionamiento más lento que el corredor de maratón - Roger Connor, Smithsonian del Aire y Espacio Museo

Pronto se hizo evidente que el MiG-temida era incapaz de interceptar SR-71 del ejército de Estados Unidos, uno de los aviones que se construyó a tratar.

"La única gran diferencia entre el MiG y el SR-71, es que el SR-71 no sólo es rápido, sino que se está ejecutando un maratón", dice Connor. "El MiG está haciendo una carrera de velocidad. Es como Usain Bolt, excepto que es un Tornillo Usain que está actualmente en funcionamiento más lento que el corredor de maratón ".

Estas limitaciones no se detuvieron MiG la construcción de más de 1.200 MiG-25. El "Foxbat" se convirtió en un plano de prestigio para las fuerzas aéreas respaldo soviético, que vieron el valor de la propaganda en fildeo del segundo mejor plano de la Tierra. Argelia y Siria todavía se cree que están volando hoy en día. India utilizó el modelo de reconocimiento con gran éxito desde hace 25 años; que sólo fueron retirados en 2006 debido a la falta de piezas de repuesto.

El temor del MiG-25 fue su efecto más impresionante, dice Trimble. "Hasta 1976, [los EE.UU.] no sabíamos que no era capaz de interceptar la SR-71, y que los mantuvimos fuera del espacio aéreo soviético todo el período. Los soviéticos habían sido muy sensibles a la idea de esos vuelos ".

El MiG-31 es esencialmente una versión mejorada del MiG-25 (Crédito: Departamento de Defensa de Estados Unidos)

Belenko a sí mismo no volver a la URSS con su avión de combate parcialmente desmontado. El desertor de alto perfil se le permitió trasladarse a los Estados Unidos - a la ciudadanía estadounidense aprobado aprobado personalmente por el presidente de Estados Unidos Jimmy Carter - en el que se convierta en un ingeniero aeronáutico y consultor de la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos.

Su identificación militar, y las notas que garabateó en una rodillera mientras volaba sobre el mar de Japón están ahora en exhibición en el Museo de la CIA en Washington DC.

Las deficiencias de MiG-25, y la llegada de la American F-15, estimuló diseñadores soviéticos para llegar a nuevos diseños. Trimble dice que esto finalmente llevó a la serie Su-27 diseñado por el rival Sukhoi de MiG. Se ha construido en un sinfín de versiones cada vez mejores. Es exactamente el tipo de avión del Pentágono preocupaba a principios de la década de 1970 - rápidas y ágiles - y las versiones más recientes son probablemente el mejor avión de combate en vuelo actualmente, dice.

La historia de MiG-25 no ha terminado del todo bien. El diseño fue muy modificada para crear el MiG-31, un combatiente armado con sensores sofisticados, un potente radar y mejores motores. "El MiG-31 es esencialmente una plena realización de lo que el MiG-25 se suponía que era", dice Trimble. El MiG-31 entró en servicio un par de años antes del final de la Guerra Fría, y cientos todavía patrullan vastas fronteras de Rusia. Los observadores occidentales han tenido un montón de oportunidades para ver el MiG-31 en exhibiciones aéreas, aunque gran parte de su funcionamiento interno se mantienen estrechamente vigilado.

Después de todo, ningún piloto ruso ha decidido - por cualquier razón - que exiliarse fuera de ese vasto país, y trasladado a su MiG-31 a un campo de aviación extranjera desprevenido.

Diria que no es tan asi....Un Mig 31 no...un Mig-29 SI.......Saludos!!!

PD: Ver "Fulcrum: A Top Gun Pilot's Escape from the Soviet Empire"
En 2001, Zuyev fallecio, en un accidente aereo cerca de Bellingham, Washington cuando su Yakolev 52 no pudo recobrarse de una perdida de sustentacion.



 
Última edición:

Noticias del Sitio

Arriba